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Founded in 1942, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a nationwide, not-for-profit organization of geriatrics healthcare professionals dedicated to improving the health, independence, and quality of life of older people. Find out more about the latest AGS news below.

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Recent Press Releases

In Comments on 2019 Medicare Fee Schedule Proposal, AGS Calls for Putting Older People First

  • In comments to @CMSgov and legislators on 2019 #Medicare Fee Schedule Proposal #MPFS2019, @AmerGeriatrics and other #geriatrics stakeholders calls for putting older people first http://ow.ly/4HNV30m6hIg

New York (Oct. 4, 2018)—In a letter sent to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and described today in an extensive editorial published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS; DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15651), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) voiced strong opposition to a proposal that would significantly change the way physicians and other qualified health care professionals are paid for Evaluation and Management (E/M) services under Medicare. According to AGS experts, the proposal presents a high risk for significant unintended consequences and could negatively impact patient care, especially for people with complex care needs. Outside the payment proposal, the AGS did commended CMS efforts to reduce the administrative burden associated with documentation requirements for E/M services, but continued to note that these positive steps forward could be overshadowed by changes to E/M payment, if finalized as written.

Cracking the (Reimbursement) Code: New Editorial Outlines a Decade of Hard Work, Big Changes to Advance Covering Care We Need as We Age

  • Cracking the (Reimbursement) Code: New @AGSJournal Editorial Outlines Decade of @AmerGeriatrics Hard Work, Big Changes to Advance Covering #Geriatrics Care We Need as We Age http://ow.ly/6XQM30m6hnn

New York (Oct. 4, 2018)—For millions of older adults who rely on Medicare, the federal health insurance program for people 65-years-old and older, it happens seamlessly and almost always behind-the-scenes: The care we receive from expert clinicians becomes five-digit “billing codes,” which in turn ensure our clinicians can be reimbursed for their work supporting our health, safety, and independence. But even billing codes have a story to tell—an important one at that, as experts from the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) describe in a new Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS) editorial (DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15593). The editorial outlines how several key health services—from those for managing chronic care to those for assessing cognitive health—came to be recognized as part of Medicare through an important but oft unsung facet of geriatrics expertise: its leaders’ engagement in building a better public policy environment to support the care we all need as we age.

New Geriatrics Research Offers Roadmap to “Revolutionary Change” for Person-Centered Care

  • New #geriatrics research published in @AGSJournal offers roadmap to “revolutionary change” for #personcenteredcare

New York (Oct. 3, 2018)—Published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS), two new research articles and a corresponding commentary from preeminent geriatrics leaders describe ways to make person-centered care—a novel approach to health that puts personal values and preferences at the forefront of decision-making—more actionable for older people. With our national health system at a tipping point favoring care focused on personal priorities, these new studies are among the first to celebrate “thoughtful, systematic, and incremental” approaches to ending care long fragmented and fraught with the potential for poor communication between patients, caregivers, and health professionals.

“Making person-centered care a reality for older adults with complex care needs will take time and effort, including significant research to move promising approaches from the lab bench to the clinic,” said William B. Applegate, MD, MPH, AGSF, Editor-in-Chief of JAGS and lead author on the editorial addressing the two new studies (DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15536). “This work is helping test innovative strategies, which will move us toward a broader and more balanced approach to care while also providing an impetus to reengineer our care systems.”

New Report on Assessing Mobility Has Experts Moving Toward Consensus on Care We Need as We Age

  • New @AGSJournal report on assessing #mobility has experts moving toward consensus on care we need as we age #geriatrics @AmerGeriatrics http://ow.ly/obHV30lXOUF

New York (Oct. 2, 2018)—Experts at the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today unveiled a list of recommendations to help health systems prioritize a vital function for us all as we age: mobility. Mobility refers to our ability to move freely and easily (on our own or with assistance). Published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS), the AGS white paper (DOI: 10.1111/jgs.15595) focuses on assessing mobility for hospitalized older adults, offering a roadmap for shifting health care’s focus away from negative markers of mobility loss and toward a deeper appreciation of ways mobility can be proactively assessed—and often preserved—to promote high-quality, person-centered care.1

Could Links Between Our Senses & Cognitive Health Explain Parts of How We Age? Experts Like the Sound (& Sight) of That, According to New Report

  • Could links between vision, hearing, & brain health explain parts of how we age? @AmerGeriatrics & #geriatrics experts like sound (& sight) of those connections, according to @AGSJournal report http://ow.ly/Ng4Y30lX4ge

New York (Sept. 24, 2018)—Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work—reported today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society—will have colleagues seeing eye-to-eye on an important but under-researched area of health care: The link between impaired vision, hearing, and cognition (the medical term for our memory and thinking capabilities, which are impacted as we age by health concerns like dementia and Alzheimer’s disease).1 With vision and hearing loss already affecting up to 40 percent of older adults1—and with one-in-ten older people already living with Alzheimer’s disease2—the conference reviewed the current state of science regarding how these common health challenges might be connected, why the answer might matter, and what can be done to reduce sensory and cognitive impairments to preserve our health for as long as possible.